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Diné (Navajo) Pottery Coffee Pot and 2 Cups [SOLD]

C3450-01-coffee.jpg

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Rose Williams
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Origin: Diné - Navajo Nation
  • Medium: clay, piñon pitch
  • Size: 7-7/8” tall x 5-1/8” diameter
  • Item # C3450.01
  • SOLD

close up viewThe Diné (Navajo) had a long tradition of making pottery before the 1800s, mostly decorated and mostly utilitarian, but, for some reason, making decorated pottery was forbidden by a Medicine Man so pottery production ceased.  Mae Adson, a relative of Rose Williams, explained the taboo against decoration as follows: “The Anasazi started to over decorate their pottery, and the wind destroyed them, because of that.  That’s why we are told not to decorate pottery.” (Rosenak, 1994)  Pottery production was eventually revived in plainware form, as this coffee pot set.

 

I do not know if Rose Williams is still producing pottery or not.  I cannot find any published biographical information on her to determine if she is still alive or not.  All I can find is that she was in her mid-90s several years ago.   Rose was an adult when she learned to make pottery, but continued doing so for over three decades.  Few other potters of the Lók'aa'dine'é Clan (Reed People) in the Shonto/Cow Springs area were as active as she.

 

Rose is known for making very large vessels, more so than other Navajo potters.  It is never known how successful a firing will be.  Many pots are lost during this final step of the process of pottery making.  This charming pottery coffee pot and the two coffee cups are indicative of Rose's widespread talent and her playfulness with the clay.

 

Condition: They are older pieces but are in original condition.

Provenance: from the personal collection of Chuck and Jan Rosenak, collectors and authors of books on Navajo folk art.

Reference:  "Navajo Pottery: Potters and their Work" by H. Diane Wright and Jan Bell, in PLATEAU, magazine of the Museum of Northern Arizona,  Volume 58, Number 2. 1987.

Recommended Reading: The People Speak: Navajo Folk Art by Chuck and Jan Rosenak

 

Rose Williams
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Origin: Diné - Navajo Nation
  • Medium: clay, piñon pitch
  • Size: 7-7/8” tall x 5-1/8” diameter
  • Item # C3450.01
  • SOLD

C3450-01-coffee.jpgC3450-01-large.jpg Click on image to view larger.