Adobe Gallery
221 Canyon Road
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501
Phone (505) 955-0550
Fax (866) 919-9506
www.adobegallery.com
info@adobegallery.com


Keyword Search

Item ID Search

Advanced Criterion Search

Please select any combination of fields and information to narrow your search.

Close Window
Advanced Search

Membership has benefits! Join My Adobe Gallery now for FREE!

Already a Member?
LOGIN NOW

Join Now!

Adobe Gallery Blog

Title: Diné (Navajo) Wedding Vessel with Appliqué Design of a Cow and Horse

Category: Pottery | Posted by Todd | Fri, Feb 8th 2013, 12:05pm

Silas and Bertha Claw broke with Navajo pottery tradition and the customs of their fellow tradesmen. Their forms remained true to tradition but they used an appliqué technique for design elements and colorful oil or acrylic paints for highlights. They were of the Shonto/Cow Springs region of the Navajo Reservation. Silas passed away in 2002 but we have found no record of Bertha passing away.

Around 1968, Silas began working in clay even though pottery making, like basket making, was considered women's work. Bertha assisted him from the very beginning. The Claws made a variety of pottery shapes: traditional-style cooking jars, wedding vases, triple-spouted jars, and ceramic beads.

It is not known which one did which part of the production but it is believed Bertha would form the vessels and Silas would decorate them with a variety of appliquéd and incised plant and animal motifs-usually in high relief and occasionally in full round. These motifs depicted a wide range of subjects that included cactus plants and blooming yuccas, oak leaves with acorns, ears of corn, a menagerie of domestic animals, and horned toads. Silas often applied oil paint in a range of colors to portions of the appliqués to make them even more realistic. He then would coat the vessel with varnish.

This wedding vessel has a horse on one side and a cow on the opposing side, both of which are fenced into a corral. Interestingly, each animal has three legs visible but it is assumed that the fourth leg of each is behind one of the others. The vessel was coated in varnish after completion and signed on the underside with the joint signature S. B. Claw.

Condition: original condition
Provenance: from the collection of Chuck and Jan Rosenak, renowned collectors and authors of Navajo Folk Art.
Recommended Reading:
- Navajo Folk Art: The People Speak by Chuck and Jan Rosenak.
- The Navajo Pottery of Silas and Bertha Claw by Ed Dobbins and Scott C. Russell, American Indian Art Magazine, Spring 2007. Vol. 32, No. 2.


Title: Diné (Navajo) Wedding Vessel with Appliqué Design of a Cow and Horse
Potters: Silas and Bertha Claw
Category: Contemporary
Origin: Diné - Navajo Nation
Medium: clay, pigment
Size: 7" tall x 4-1/2" diameter
Item # 25605

Silas and Bertha Claw broke with Navajo pottery tradition and the customs of their fellow tradesmen.  Their forms remained true to tradition but they used an appliqué technique for design elements and colorful oil or acrylic paints for highlights.  They were of the Shonto/Cow Springs region of the Navajo Reservation.  Silas passed away in 2002 but we have found no record of Bertha passing away.    Around 1968, Silas began working in clay even though pottery making, like basket making, was considered women's work.  Bertha assisted him from the very beginning.  The Claws made a variety of pottery shapes: traditional-style cooking jars, wedding vases, triple-spouted jars, and ceramic beads.   It is not known which one did which part of the production but it is believed Bertha would form the vessels and Silas would decorate them with a variety of appliquéd and incised plant and animal motifs—usually in high relief and occasionally in full round. These motifs depicted a wide range of subjects that included cactus plants and blooming yuccas, oak leaves with acorns, ears of corn, a menagerie of domestic animals, and horned toads. Silas often applied oil paint in a range of colors to portions of the appliqués to make them even more realistic. He then would coat the vessel with varnish.   This wedding vessel has a horse on one side and a cow on the opposing side, both of which are fenced into a corral.  Interestingly, each animal has three legs visible but it is assumed that the fourth leg of each is behind one of the others.  The vessel was coated in varnish after completion and signed on the underside with the joint signature S. B. Claw.   Condition: original condition Provenance: from the collection of Chuck and Jan Rosenak, renowned collectors and authors of Navajo Folk Art.  Recommended Reading:  - Navajo Folk Art: The People Speak by Chuck and Jan Rosenak. - The Navajo Pottery of Silas and Bertha Claw by Ed Dobbins and Scott C. Russell, American Indian Art Magazine, Spring 2007. Vol. 32, No. 2.

0 Comments

Leave a Comment on this Blog Post

Want to join the conversation? You must be logged in to My Adobe Gallery in order to comment on this post.

Please Login