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Redware Seed Jar by Annie Nampeyo [SOLD]

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Annie Healing Nampeyo (1884-1968) Quinchawa
  • Category: Historic
  • Origin: Hopi-Tewa
  • Medium: Native Clay, Slip, Paint
  • Size: 3" deep x 7" diameter
  • Item # C2792B
  • SOLD

Collectors of contemporary pottery today are very interested in purchasing pieces that are signed by the artist. This was not true in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was sufficient to select a piece based on its personal appeal to the potential collector. Most of the late 19th and early 20th century pieces are not identified with a particular potter.

There is an exception in the case of two Hopi potters of note—Nampeyo of Hano and her eldest daughter Annie Healing Nampeyo. Nampeyo became famous, not only because she was an outstanding artisan, but because the Fred Harvey Company housed her and her family in the Hopi House at the Grand Canyon in the summers of the early 1900s, where she demonstrated pottery making and sold her wares. It is well known that Healing collaborated with her mom in the early part of the century. She also made pottery herself, although precious little recognition was given to her in those early days.

Fortunately, collectors for some of the major museums did document collections by artist name at the time. Collections of the Peabody Museum at Harvard, the University of Oslo, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Smithsonian do contain documented vessels by Healing. It is from these documented pieces that we are able to make comparisons today and attribute pieces to the hands of Healing.

It is well documented that she created highly polished red wares with black and white painting. Her preference for designs was large bold elements that stand singly on the surface of the pot, such as these two magnificent birds executed in black and highlighted with white paint.

From the relative small but informative museum collections referenced above, some generalizations as to Healing’s vessel shapes and design preferences can be drawn, and a close study of these confirms that this jar falls firmly within her style.

This magnificent small seed jar is in excellent condition. Examination with UV light does not reveal any restoration or repair.

Annie Healing Nampeyo (1884-1968) Quinchawa
  • Category: Historic
  • Origin: Hopi-Tewa
  • Medium: Native Clay, Slip, Paint
  • Size: 3" deep x 7" diameter
  • Item # C2792B
  • SOLD

1220141736.jpg1220141736b.jpg Click on image to view larger.
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