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Hopi Second Mesa Plaque [SOLD]

C3368D-basket.jpg

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Weaver Unknown
  • Category: Trays and Plaques
  • Origin: Hopi Pueblo
  • Medium: grasses, yucca, dyes
  • Size: 12-3/4” diameter x 2-1/8” deep
  • Item # C3368D
  • SOLD

Coiled basketry of this type is made exclusively in Second Mesa villages on the Hopi Reservation. Each stitch of a coil is interlocked into the adjoining stitch of the previous coil. An awl is used to facilitate this. This basket probably took the weaver more than two months to complete the weaving process alone, not counting the months of gathering materials, drying the yucca leaves, then splitting them to a thin, consistent width, dying some of them, and preparing the grass for the foundation. I have watched a number of women at Second Mesa villages make baskets over the years, and I am in awe of their patience and fortitude.

 

The design of this plaque is very subtlety divided into four quadrants by a very faint green pigment applied over the yucca, a technique I have not seen before on Hopi basketry.  The two large designs with red appear to possibly represent an unmarried Hopi girl's hair whorl, but this is speculation on our part. It is conceivable that this was used in a ceremonial function relating to a young Hopi female.

 

Condition:  very slight fading between front and back, otherwise in excellent condition

Provenance: from the collection of a member of the Balcomb family

Recommended ReadingHopi Basket Weaving, Artistry in Natural Fibers, by Helga Teiwes.

Coiled basketry of this type is made exclusively in Second Mesa villages on the Hopi Reservation. Each stitch of a coil is interlocked into the adjoining stitch of the previous coil. An awl is used to facilitate this. This basket probably took the weaver more than two months to complete the weaving process alone, not counting the months of gathering materials, drying the yucca leaves, then splitting them to a thin, consistent width, dying some of them, and preparing the grass for the foundation. I have watched a number of women at Second Mesa villages make baskets over the years, and I am in awe of their patience and fortitude.  The design of this plaque is very subtlety divided into four quadrants by a very faint green pigment applied over the yucca, a technique I have not seen before on Hopi basketry.  The two large designs with red appear to possibly represent an unmarried Hopi girl’s hair whorl, but this is speculation on our part. It is conceivable that this was used in a ceremonial function relating to a young Hopi female.  Condition:  very slight fading between front and back, otherwise in excellent condition Provenance: from the collection of a member of the Balcomb family Recommended Reading:  Hopi Basket Weaving, Artistry in Natural Fibers, by Helga Teiwes.

 

Weaver Unknown
  • Category: Trays and Plaques
  • Origin: Hopi Pueblo
  • Medium: grasses, yucca, dyes
  • Size: 12-3/4” diameter x 2-1/8” deep
  • Item # C3368D
  • SOLD

C3368D-basket.jpgC3368D-large.jpg Click on image to view larger.
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