American Indian Art Magazine Back Issues


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Mary G. Hamilton, Publisher
  • Subject: Native American Art
  • Item # M1
  • Date Published:
  • Size: Back Issues
  • Price: $6.00

For almost 40 years, American Indian Art Magazine has been the premier magazine devoted exclusively to the great variety of American Indian art. This beautifully illustrated quarterly features articles by leading experts, the latest information on current auction results, publications, legal issues, museum and gallery exhibitions and events.

If you would like to see if there are more back issues, click here to view their website which also has a new index of all issues from 40 years!

 


CURRENT ISSUES WE HAVE


 Autumn  1987  $12
 Autumn  1991  $10
 Autumn  2014  $12
 Spring  2015  $12
 Autumn  2015  $20

 


Volume 12 | Number 4 | Autumn 1987

American Indian Art Magazine - Special Pottery Issue - Autumn 1987POTTERY ISSUE


16 MUSEUMS

21 AUCTION BLOCK

by Harmer Johnson

23 GALLERIES

28 MARTINA VIGIL AND FLORENTINO MONTOYA:
MASTER POTTERS OF SAN ILDEFONSO AND COHITI PUEBLOS

by Jonathan Batkin
Offers a detailed look at the careers of husband and wife pottery makers, Florentino Montoya and Martina Vigil, suggesting that while they have been mentioned by authors discussing San Ildefonso pottery, they have not yet received the attention they deserve.

38 ZIA MATTE-PAINT POTTERY: A 300-YEAR HISTORY
by Michael J. Hering
Outlines a 300-year continuum of Zia matte-paint pottery, describing the stylistic changes as well as the consistencies in the ceramics made from the 1680s to the 1980s.

46 HOW OLD IS THAT ACOMA POT?
by Richard M. Howard
Suggests that while in most cases one cannot answer the question of how old a particular Acoma pot is, there are two design characteristics that did not appear on Acoma water jars until about 1890 and can therefore serve as useful time markers.

50 “THOSE, THEY CALLED THEM MONOS”:
COCHITI FIGURATIVE CERAMICS, 1875–1905

by Barbara A. Babcock
Presents an overview of nineteenth-century figurative pottery production at Cochiti Pueblo, offering possible explanations of why the figurative ceramics—unusual in both quantity and quality—have been frequently dismissed by dealers and curators.

58 BROWN EARTH AND LAUGHTER:
THE CLAY PEOPLE OF NORA NARANJO-MORSE

by Stephen Trimble
Introduces Nora Naranjo-Morse to readers in a personal way—through her own words—and illustrates a sampling of the often humorous work of this young Santa Clara artist.

76 BOOK REVIEW
PLAINS INDIAN SCULPTURE: A TRADITIONAL ART FROM AMERICA’S HEARTLAND. Reviewed by F. Dennis Lessard.

86 ADVERTISER INDEX

 


 

 

 

Volume 16 | Number 4 | Autumn 1991

 

American Indian Art Magazine Volume 16 | Number 4 | Autumn 199124 MUSEUMS

28 GALLERIES

31 AUCTION BLOCK

by Harmer Johnson

32 CALENDAR OF AUTUMN EVENTS

38 GEOLOGISTS, WHALERS AND ANTHROPOLOGISTS: THE BUILDING OF A MUSEUM COLLECTION OF INUIT CLOTHING

by Judy Hall
Provides a detailed account of the history of the large and quite well documented collection of Inuit clothing at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull, Quebec, which consists of some two thousand items.

48 A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY: PLAINS PICTURE LETTERS, FORT MARION AND SITTING BULL
by Joyce B. Szabo
Illustrates and details a two-page picture letter that was inadvertently misdirected in 1877 and, as a consequence, misinterpreted as posing a threat to the United States military forces as a result of an imagined plot involving Sitting Bull and his people in Canada.

56 THREE GREAT POTTERS OF SAN ILDEFONSO AND THEIR LEGACY
by Jonathan Batkin
Focuses on three important potters at San Ildefonso in the late nineteenth century and some of their descendants, illuminating some previously unknown relationships among potters, as well as explaining more completely the relationship between those making the pots and those painting them.

70 PICTOGRAPHIC SIOUX BEADWORK, A RE-EXAMINATION
by F. Dennis Lessard
Offers a second look at a series of objects beaded in the style of pictographic drawings, revising identification of the items and suggesting some additional interpretations based on recently uncovered information about the beadwork.

77 LEGAL BRIEFS
by Ron McCoy

110 ADVERTISER INDEX

 

 


American Indian Art Magazine Autumn 2014 issueVolume 39 | Number 4 | Autumn 2014

14 Galleries

22 Auction Block
by Harmer Johnson

28 Museums

38 Yoo-Nteele: Western Apache T-Necklaces
by Alan Ferg
Examines the history of the T-shaped, glass-beadwork necklace known in Apache as yoo-nteele, which was first made by the San Carlos and White Mountain Apaches. Today, this kind of necklace is viewed as an icon of Western Apache culture and is worn by girls at their puberty ceremonies.

50 Unconquered History: 
The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum Collection
by Tara J. Backhouse
Profiles the collections of the tribally owned and operated Ah- Tah-Thi-Ki Museum near Clewiston, Florida. The museum’s collections celebrate the Seminoles’ strength, sovereignty and survival in an environment nearly inhospitable to humans and objects.  

58 Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee 
Exhibitors at 
Nineteenth-Century Upper 
Canadian Provincial Exhibitions
by Sherry Brydon
Follows the experiences of Aboriginal artists and the exhibition history of their work during a twenty-year period at nineteenth-century Upper Canadian Provincial Exhibitions.

70 Floral Journey: The Hidden Language of Flowers in Native North American Beadwork
by Lois S. Dubin and Paige Bardolph
Highlights the exhibition Floral Journey: Native North American Beadwork at the Autry National Center of the American West in Los Angeles. This is the first comprehensive exploration of how European-introduced floral designs, woven and embroidered in moose hair, quills and tiny glass beads, became a remarkable art form as well as an important means of economic and cultural resilience.

82 Calendar of Autumn Events

88 Legal Briefs
by Ron McCoy
NAGPRA Updates: February 19–June 6, 2013

102 Advertiser Index


American Indian Art Magazine Spring 2015 issueVolume 40 | Number 2 | Spring 2015

To continue our celebration of the magazine’s fortieth year of publication, this issue features articles by members of our Editorial Advisory Board, as well as columns that look back at four decades of scholarship, legal issues and collecting trends in American Indian art.

14 Galleries

20 Auction Block
by Harmer Johnson

26 Books

32 Museums

38 Dennis Cusick—A Tuscarora Artist at Seneca Mission: Missionary Propaganda and American Vernacular Culture, 1820–1822
by Janet Catherine Berlo
Examines the work of Tuscarora artist Dennis Cusick within two contexts: the extraordinarily active mission societies operating in the United States in the 1820s, and American vernacular culture, where images and objects circulated across boundaries of gender, race, class and culture.

52 Honoring the Bird People: 
Three Hundred Years of Navajo Bird Art

by Susan Brown McGreevy and Harry Walters
In Navajos’ worldview, birds are considered sacred. This survey of avian art reveals Navajo artists’ abiding interest in, and deep appreciation of, the bird life that can be observed throughout their Southwestern homeland.

58 The Use of Plant Fibers 
in Plains Indian Embroidery

by Candace S. Greene
Examines the utilization of adjunct materials employed in the embroidery art of Plains Indian women and explores possible identifications of the plant fibers used both in conjunction with porcupine quills and as sole embroidery materials.

72 Hybrid Vigor: The Transmission of Indigenous Inuit Art Forms in the Age of Globalization
by Molly Lee
Discusses the pivotal role played by non-Native entrepreneurs in the development of postcontact Inuit art forms, and highlights how art forms that once traveled by diffusion are today at the beck and call of globalization.

86 Legal Briefs
by Ron McCoy
Repatriation of Cultural Objects

88 Calendar of Spring Events

94 Advertiser Index


American Indian Art Magazine Autumn 2015 issueVolume 40 | Number 4 | Autumn 2015

17  Galleries

22  Auction Block
by Harmer Johnson

30  Museums

36  Calendar of Autumn Events

40  A Note from the Publisher

42  The Bluecloud Dolls of Granite Falls: 
A Dakota Story

by Marcia G. Anderson and Herb Dorr
Examines the provenance and characteristics of some Native American dolls of the northern Plains, specifically those of the authentically garbed cloth-body dolls attributed to Dakota dollmaker Rebecca Bluecloud, a number of which are in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul.

48  Quilled Trapezoidal Pouches from the 
Western Great Lakes Region

by Sylvia S. Kasprycki
This first major study of trapezoidal pouches, based on a sample of twenty-two extant pieces, discusses their collection histories, construction, materials and motifs, and compares them to similar bags, as well as to other quilled items.

64  David Longstreet: White Mountain Apache Scout and Master Tailor
by Alan Ferg
Recounts the career of David Longstreet, a highly accomplished maker of traditional buckskin clothing, including girls’ puberty dresses and men’s shirts, and presents a suite of attributes that can aid researchers in identifying his work.

76  Early Northeastern Collections at the 
Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

by Ruth B. Phillips and Janet M. Davidson
Examines a small but important collection of early contact-period material from northeastern North America, which was originally acquired by European military personnel, and discusses the way in which these objects eventually arrived in Wellington, New Zealand.

94  Books

104  Legal Briefs
by Ron McCoy
Closing the Circle

110  Advertiser Index3

Mary G. Hamilton, Publisher
  • Subject: Native American Art
  • Item # M1
  • Date Published:
  • Size: Back Issues
  • Price: $6.00

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