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HISTORY OF HAWIKUH NEW MEXICO [SOLD]


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Frederick Hodge, et al.
  • Subject: Southwest Anthropology and History
  • Item # C4174i
  • Date Published: Vol 1. Paperback, first edition, 1937
  • Size: 26 Plate Illustrations and 2 Figures. 155 pages
  • SOLD

HISTORY OF HAWIKUH NEW MEXICO

One of the So-Called Cities of Cíbola

By Frederick Webb Hodge

The Southwest Museum, Los Angeles, 1937

Publications of the Frederick Webb Hodge Anniversary Publications Fund

Volume 1

Paperback, first edition, 1937.  26 Plate Illustrations and 2 Figures.  155 pages


CONTENTS

Legend of the Seven Cities

The Northern Mystery

  Nuño de Guzmán Sallies Forth, 1529

  Cabeza de Vaca Appears, 1536

  Juan de la Asunción and Pedro Nadal, 1538

  Fray Marcos de Niza, 1539

     The Negro Estevan Reaches Hawikuh and is Killed

Fray Marcos Asserts that he Views Hawikuh Returns to Mexico

     The Coronado Expedition, 1540-1542

The Army Organizes and Takes the Trail

The Battle of Hawikuh

Identification of Cíbola-Granada and Hawikuh

The Pueblos of Cíbola-Zuñi Described

Rodríguez-Chamuscado Expedition, 1581

Espejo Expedition, 1582-1583

Journey of Castaño de Sosa, 1590

Leyva de Bonilla and Gutiérrez de Humaña, 1593

Oñate’s Entrada and Colonization, 1598

  Oñate Visits the Zuñi

Missionary Labors

  Mission Founded at Hawikuh, 1629

The Hawikuh Tragedy of 1632

Subsequent Events, 1635-1672

Hawikuh Raided and Abandoned, 1672-1680

Final echoes

Notes

Synonymy

  The Zuñi and Their Tribal Range

  Hawikuh

  Kechipawan or K’iánawa

  Hálona

  Kwákina

  K’iákima

  Mátsaki


From the FOREWORD

It had long been the ambition of the writer to excavate the ruins of a pueblo in the Southwest known to have been inhabited from prehistoric times well into the historic period, and none appealed to him so strongly as Hawikuh, one of the ancient settlements of the Zuñi tribe.

The opportunity to excavate Hawikuh was not presented until 1917, when an expedition under the joint auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution and the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, commenced research at the site.

“During the six years of excavation at Hawikuh, the crew of eastern anthropologists and Zuni workmen cleared some 370 rooms of the accumulated debris of more than three centuries; exhumed more than 1,000 burials; excavated the Spanish mission church and convento; and recovered 1,600 restorable ceramic vessels, plus thousands of other objects, both European and Native American. Among the artifacts recovered were five copper crossbow dart points characteristic of the Coronado expedition, as well as other objects also likely associated with the expedition.”   NewMexicoHistory.org

Frederick Hodge, et al.
  • Subject: Southwest Anthropology and History
  • Item # C4174i
  • Date Published: Vol 1. Paperback, first edition, 1937
  • Size: 26 Plate Illustrations and 2 Figures. 155 pages
  • SOLD

Publisher:
  • ,

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