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KACHINA: Messengers of the Hopi and Zuñi Gods - Kachina Messagers Des Dieux Hopi et Zunis [SOLD]


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Éric Geneste and Éric Mickeler
  • Subject: Katsina and Other Dolls
  • Item # C4037B
  • Date Published: 2011
  • Size: 192 pages
  • SOLD

KACHINA: Messengers of the Hopi and Zuñi Gods - Kachina Messagers Des Dieux Hopi et Zunis

Text is in dual languages of French and English.

From the back cover:

Guardian beings in the Native American Hopi and Zuni cultures of New Mexico and Arizona, kachinas are spirits of fire, rain, wind or the departed. There are practical joker kachinas, mischievous kachinas, even malevolent ones.

Summoned in ritual ceremonies, these messengers of the gods use their beneficial powers to allow humans to continue their journey through life. Masked dancers dress up as kachinas for religious purposes. Kachina dolls are made to familiarize Hopi children with the liturgy of their tribe. Kachinas rhythm the entire life cycle of the Hopis. Anthropologists have identified over 300 kachina figurines. Usually carved from cottonwood roots, kachina dolls have undergone a considerable typological evolution. Initially carved in geometric shapes, they gradually began to borrow naturalistic human anatomical details and, with the passing centuries, have acquired elaborate garments and headdresses.

The evocative power of kachina dolls has long fascinated Western Europeans. Artists and writers such as Max Ernst, Andre Breton, Paul Eluard and Claude Levi-Strauss, among others, were keenly interested in Hopi art and assembled stunning collections of kachina dolls. Max Ernst never got into his car without taking along a kachina doll.

Esprits du feu, de la pluie, du vent, des morts, esprits farceurs, espiegles ou malfaisants, les Kachina sont les esprits tutelaires de la culture indienne hopi et zurii du Nouveau-Mexique et de I'Arizona. Invoques lors des fetes rituelles, ces messagers des dieux font usage de leurs pouvoirs benefiques afin d'aider les hommes a poursuivre leur voyage dans la vie. Incarnes par des danseurs masques et costumes, les Kachina sont aussi des poupees destinees aux enfants qui les familiarisent avec la liturgie hopi. Elles rythment toute la vie des Hopis, a tel point que I'on comptera plus de 300 effigies selon les anthropologues.

Souvent fabriquees en racine de peuplier americain, ces figurines ont connu une evolution typologique considerable. Tout d'abord sculptees dans des formes geometriques, elles emprunteront peu a peu b I'homme des details anatomiques et s'orneront au fil des siecles de vetements et de parures.

Le pouvoir suggestif des poupees Kachina a fascine les Occidentaux. Ainsi, pris de passion pour I'art hopi, Max Ernst, Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, Claude Levi-Strauss, entre autres, en constituerent de belles collections, Max Ernst ne prenant d'ailleurs jamais le volant de sa voiture sans avoir au prealable embarque une poupee Kachina!

 

 

Éric Geneste and Éric Mickeler
  • Subject: Katsina and Other Dolls
  • Item # C4037B
  • Date Published: 2011
  • Size: 192 pages
  • SOLD

Publisher:
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