Eva Gorline Navajo Third Phase Chief Style Textile

C4636B-rug.jpg

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Eva Gorline, Diné of the Navajo Nation Weaver
  • Category: Navajo Textiles
  • Origin: Diné of the Navajo Nation
  • Medium: wool, dye, velcro strip
  • Size: 51” x 50”
  • Item # C4636B
  • Price: $2750

This Navajo textile was woven by Diné of the Navajo Nation artist Eva Gorline in the mid-1950s according to the current owner. It is in the style of a Third Phase Chief blanket of the nineteenth century. This style is sometimes referred to as a nine-spot pattern, so designated because of the nine red triangles in the design.

The classic First Phase Navajo blankets often consisted of black and white bands with a wide band of indigo in the center. Second Phase blankets added bands of red yarn, typically at each end and in the center of the textile. Third Phase blankets appeared with the red triangles, as in this textile.

This weaving has gray yarn at the ends, and at the center, substituting for the red of the 19th century textiles. The black rows replace the indigo ones of the older blankets.

A useful way of remembering which is warp and which is weft is: 'one of them goes from weft to wight'.

Warp and Weft: In weaving, the weft is the term for the yarn, which is drawn through, inserted over-and-under, the lengthwise warp yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom to create cloth. Warp is the lengthwise or longitudinal thread in a roll, while weft is the transverse thread. The weft is a thread usually made of spun fiber. The original fibers used were wool or cotton. Because the weft does not have to be stretched on a loom in the way that the warp is, it can generally be less strong. The weft is threaded through the warp using a "shuttle." -Wikipedia


Condition: This textile, approximately 65 years old, is in excellent condition because it has only been displayed by hanging, never used on the floor. The previous owner stitched a strip of Velcro on the back to facilitate hanging the rug. The Velcro is still attached. It could be removed if desired.

Provenance: this Eva Gorline Navajo Third Phase Chief Style Textile is from an estate in California

Recommended Reading: The Navajo Weaving Tradition 1650 to the Present by Kaufman and Selser

TAGS: Diné of the Navajo NationNavajo TextilesEva Gorline

Alternate close-up view of a section of this Navajo textile.

 

Eva Gorline, Diné of the Navajo Nation Weaver
  • Category: Navajo Textiles
  • Origin: Diné of the Navajo Nation
  • Medium: wool, dye, velcro strip
  • Size: 51” x 50”
  • Item # C4636B
  • Price: $2750

C4636B-rug.jpgC4636B-large.jpg Click on image to view larger.