Adobe Gallery
221 Canyon Road
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501
Phone (505) 955-0550
Fax (866) 919-9506
www.adobegallery.com
info@adobegallery.com


Keyword Search

Item ID Search

Advanced Criterion Search

Please select any combination of fields and information to narrow your search.

Close Window
Advanced Search

Membership has benefits! Join My Adobe Gallery now for FREE!

Already a Member?
LOGIN NOW

Join Now!



Original Painting of Pueblo Maiden with Pottery

C4148V-paint.jpg

+ Add to my watchlist Forward to Friend


Unidentified Artist
  • Category: Paintings
  • Origin: Acoma Pueblo
  • Medium: Watercolor on paper
  • Size:
    12-¾” x 9-¾” image;
    20-⅝” x 17-⅝” framed
  • Item # C4148V
  • Price: $525.00

The intriguing smile of the Pueblo maiden in this painting recalls Leonardo da Vinci's memorable Mona Lisa. Added to the fact that the artist is also unknown, this watercolor has an element of mystery. Who was she? Who painted her? When and where was it painted? Unfortunately, we do not know the exact answers to most of these questions, but we have clues.

What we can say is that it is a skillfully rendered image of a Pueblo woman with an OLLA on her head. There are photographs from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that chronicle women from Acoma and Zuni pueblos carrying ollas or water jars on their heads, but there is no way for us to determine where the young woman in the painting—or is there a clue to its origin? The subject is dressed in traditional Pueblo attire—a black manta fastened on her right shoulder, white deerskin moccasins that cover her legs, a colorful shawl over her head and a finely woven red sash around her waist. Details of the clothing seem to indicate that the artist was quite familiar with elements of traditional Pueblo dress. A well decorated OLLA is on the head of the woman, who stands in front of a multi-storied pueblo village.

The OLLA has black-on-white design elements. And there are multi-storied buildings behind the Pueblo female. Only a few Pueblos today still have these multi-storied structures. With these clues, we can give an educated guess and suggest that the location is atop the mesa at Sky City or Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico.  

Artist Signature - Felicitas Lucero - Acoma PuebloDuring this time period, Pueblo women were expected to make pottery and not paint. And so, there were only a few Native American female easel artists in the early 20th century. It was only until the first woman pushed through this glass ceiling and demanded she be taken seriously. Quah Ah was this brave woman. She mentored other Native American women and girls, such as Pablita Velarde and apparently this artist, to do what they want and paint instead of making pottery. It is most probable that this piece was made during the second half of the 20th century and is most rare. It is signed By Felicitas Lucero. We are unable to find any biographical information about this talented Pueblo artist.


Condition: this Original Painting of Pueblo Maiden with Pottery is in appears to be in good condition.  It has been recently framed using archival materials and regular glass.

Provenance: From the large collection of a New York resident

Recommended Reading: American Indian Painting of the Southwest and Plains Areas by Dorothy Dunn

** If you discover credit omissions or have additional information to add, please let us know at Marketing adobegallery.com.

Unidentified Artist
  • Category: Paintings
  • Origin: Acoma Pueblo
  • Medium: Watercolor on paper
  • Size:
    12-¾” x 9-¾” image;
    20-⅝” x 17-⅝” framed
  • Item # C4148V
  • Price: $525.00

C4148V-paint.jpgC4148V-large.jpg Click on image to view larger.