Hopi Hon - Bear Katsina Doll

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Otto Pentewa (1886-1961) Sikovaya - Pumpkin Flower

Otto Pentewa is a name any collector of Hopi Katsina dolls recognizes.  They may never have seen him or seen his signature on a Katsina doll, but they recognize his work at a glance.  He was born at the village of Oraibi on the Hopi Reservation at the end of the 19th century.  He was of the Katsina Clan and his Hopi name was Sikovaya, which translates to Pumpkin Flower.

Otto Pentewa Traditional Katsina Dolls Kachina Dolls Hopi Pueblo signature hallmark

One of the distinguishing designs on his Katsina carvings is the pumpkin flower he generally painted on the loin cloth of the doll.  It was his signature. 

Otto Pentewa is a name any collector of Hopi Katsina dolls recognizes.  They may never have seen him or seen his signature on a Katsina doll, but they recognize his work at a glance.  He was born at the village of Oraibi on the Hopi Reservation at the end of the 19th century.  He was of the Katsina Clan and his Hopi name was Sikovaya, which translates to Pumpkin Flower.  One of the distinguishing designs on his Katsina carvings is the pumpkin flower he generally painted on the loin cloth of the doll.  It was his signature.    Shortly after the turn of the century, he married and moved to the village of Kykotsmovi where he and his wife raised eleven children.  His son, Richard Pentewa, continued in the tradition of carving Katsina dolls.    This Hon Katsina doll is larger than most of his carvings.  It is embellished with fur, leather, shells and yarn as were all of his carvings.  Condition: very good condition considering its age  Provenance: from a gentleman in Albuquerque  Recommended Reading:  The Katsina Carvings of Otto Pentewa by Barry Walsh in American Indian Art Magazine.  Summer 2001.

Shortly after the turn of the century, he married and moved to the village of Kykotsmovi where he and his wife raised eleven children.  His son, Richard Pentewa, continued in the tradition of carving Katsina dolls. 

This Hon Katsina doll is larger than most of his carvings.  It is embellished with fur, leather, shells and yarn as were all of his carvings.

 

Condition: this Hopi Hon - Bear Katsina Doll is in good condition considering its age, with some loss of hair, particularly on the face.

Provenance: from a gentleman in Albuquerque

Recommended ReadingThe Katsina Carvings of Otto Pentewa by Barry Walsh in American Indian Art Magazine.  Summer 2001.

Alternate view of the front of the face of this Katsina.