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Original Painting of Pueblo Deer Dance

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José Encarnacion Peña (1902-1979) Soqween - So Kwa A Weh (Frost on the Mountain)
  • Category: Paintings
  • Origin: San Ildefonso Pueblo
  • Medium: watercolor
  • Size: 11-5/8” x 16-7/8” image; 19-1/8” x 24-3/8” framed
  • Item # 25501
  • Price: $1,200.00

Encarnacion Pena Signature

Peña was a student of Dorothy Dunn at The Studio of the Santa Fe Indian School in the early 1930s. He had, however, started painting earlier than the 1920s, and continued until his death in 1979. His complete name was José Encarnación Peña and his Native name was spelled SoqueenSoqween, So Kwa a Weh, translated to Frost on the Mountain. Those who remember him in his later years recall that he was called Enky (pronounced "inky").

Peña was painting at San Ildefonso at the same time as Tonita Peña, Ricardo Martinez, Luís Gonzales, Abel Sánchez, and Romando Vigil. He was not very productive in the early years but became so about ten years before he passed away. He is represented in the collections of the Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe; Museum of New Mexico; Denver Art Museum; and many others.

Soqueen's attention to detail was meticulous and his renderings of figures were sensitive and delicate. His paintings reflect a more realistic approach to painting what he saw and knew from pueblo life, than a more artistic approach for decorative purposes.

This painting of a Deer Dance shows four dancers, two of whom appear to be adults and two young men or children.  The intent could possibly have been to depict perspective by making two dancers smaller and two larger or it could be as often seen where there are adults and children dancing.  He was always careful in depicting dances realistically while expressing his intuitive response to the dancers being painted.

I knew Peña personally and enjoyed knowing him. He was a very attractive man and very quiet and pleasant. I was able to purchase a few paintings from him in late 1978 and early 1979 just before he passed away. I had opened Adobe Gallery in September 1978 and he passed away in October 1979, so our acquaintance was for just a year. This painting was completed in 1976, just a few years before he passed away.

A beautiful color photograph of Peña that he gave me may be viewed by clicking on the artist's name which will bring up a short biography and the photograph. 

Condition:  The painting is in original excellent condition.  It has just been framed using all acid-free materials and a black wood frame.

Provenance: From a San Ildefonso Pueblo resident to whom Peña gave the painting.

Recommended Reading:  Southwest Indian Painting a changing art by Clara Lee Tanner

Peña was a student of Dorothy Dunn at The Studio of the Santa Fe Indian School in the early 1930s. He had, however, started painting earlier than the 1920s, and continued until his death in 1979. His complete name was José Encarnación Peña and his Native name was spelled Soqueen, Soqween, So Kwa a Weh, translated to Frost on the Mountain. Those who remember him in his later years recall that he was called Enky (pronounced "inky"). Peña was painting at San Ildefonso at the same time as Tonita Peña, Ricardo Martinez, Luís Gonzales, Abel Sánchez, and Romando Vigil. He was not very productive in the early years but became so about ten years before he passed away. He is represented in the collections of the Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe; Museum of New Mexico; Denver Art Museum; and many others. Soqueen's attention to detail was meticulous and his renderings of figures were sensitive and delicate. His paintings reflect a more realistic approach to painting what he saw and knew from pueblo life, than a more artistic approach for decorative purposes. This painting of a Deer Dance shows four dancers, two of whom appear to be adults and two young men or children.  The intent could possibly have been to depict perspective by making two dancers smaller and two larger or it could be as often seen where there are adults and children dancing.  He was always careful in depicting dances realistically while expressing his intuitive response to the dancers being painted. I knew Peña personally and enjoyed knowing him. He was a very attractive man and very quiet and pleasant. I was able to purchase a few paintings from him in late 1978 and early 1979 just before he passed away. I had opened Adobe Gallery in September 1978 and he passed away in October 1979, so our acquaintance was for just a year. This painting was completed in 1976, just a few years before he passed away. A beautiful color photograph of Peña that he gave me may be viewed by clicking on the artist's name which will bring up a short biography and the photograph.  Condition:  The painting is in original excellent condition.  It has just been framed using all acid-free materials and a black wood frame. Provenance: From a San Ildefonso Pueblo resident to whom Peña gave the painting. Recommended Reading:  Southwest Indian Painting a changing art by Clara Lee Tanner

 

 

José Encarnacion Peña (1902-1979) Soqween - So Kwa A Weh (Frost on the Mountain)
  • Category: Paintings
  • Origin: San Ildefonso Pueblo
  • Medium: watercolor
  • Size: 11-5/8” x 16-7/8” image; 19-1/8” x 24-3/8” framed
  • Item # 25501
  • Price: $1,200.00

25501-paint.jpg25501-large.jpg Click on image to view larger.